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Elderly online dating scams

Senior Online Dating Scams in 2021: Things to Know and Protection,☆ Recent Articles ☆

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pay off your credit cards. Limited time offers are their big draw, and, because of this, the FTC has implored the public to recognize that consumers have the same ability and resources available to them, without getting help from a paid company.

Even in retirement, many seniors are interested in earning extra money. Unfortunately, scammers create schemes that will seem easy at first glance but are disastrous upon further inspection. These schemes can include pyramid scams, home medical billing, work at home business offers, envelope stuffing schemes, mystery shopping scams, government job scams, and more.

You might be asked to pay a fee upfront to receive a list of business opportunities most of which are illegitimate or useless or redirected to a website that will phish your personal information.

The FTC wants consumers to beware that scam artists likely run most work at home opportunities and pop-up business opportunities. Classified ads also create fake job offers, beware of requests to pay for the job or deposit a check or overage and transfer the money to your employer. Not only does the FTC want seniors to be careful, but MoneyGram and Western Union do too. All money transfer and wire services, along with financial institutions, know that consumers can and will be extorted from.

Seniors might wire or transfer money to someone they have a personal connection with online via romance scams or for an internet purchase such as buying a vehicle. Other times, seniors receive a check in the mail and are asked to transfer the funds.

As it is a counterfeit check, it may not be realized until you deposit it, transfer funds, and get charged bank fees and deducted the sum you transferred. The short version of this long story is to beware of money transfers as it can be a form of fraud. You hear about a fantastic property or rental. The owner sends you pictures of the property and the address. Since the owner is traveling for work and out of the area, they ask for you to submit your information and send them a deposit via cash through the mail, through money wire, or app transfer.

Unfortunately, several things can happen. When you submit your credit report and app by email, you will expose all your information to the fraudster. They might use it to open fake financial accounts in your name or sell your information. Either way, you have then been a victim of identity theft. Or, they keep any money you send them. The property was never theirs, to begin with, and a foreign scammer usually run elderly scams. Instead, the consumer agrees to something free and straightforward, such as a one time sample or credit report.

Once they access the report, they are suddenly signed up for ongoing paid fees. This type of scam can happen when you buy any product that signs you up for ongoing delivery monthly, until or unless you opt-out. Automatic billing is often part of negative option marketing. Even companies that people trust take advantage of this type of billing. However, anti-aging and health claims trick seniors into useless products, overpriced products, or products that will keep renewing monthly without their consent — similar to negative option marketing.

These products can even be dangerous, such as fake Botox or products that serve no actual value but are marketed and sold as healthy. Anti-aging and health claim scams typically tell lies, and false claims are used when advertising.

This type of scam strikes everyone age 40 and up. They are then told they have to complete a form within five days of receiving this letter, which asks for personal information.

With personal information and fees, scammers can then perform identity theft and steal even more money from these innocent seniors. The following are recent, relevant settlements with the FTC related to elderly scams. Each of these examples provides seniors and their families with cautionary tales about what to look for, avoid, and how to handle similar situations.

The FTC settled with the defendants at Hite Media Group, LLC, over their fraudulent grant scheme. The con targeted seniors and those with disabilities who wanted help with personal expenses.

When we warned you about sweepstakes scams, we had good reason. The FTC and the State of Missouri recently settled their March case against the company, Next-Gen, which impacted and targeted older adults. Most frightening, the company sold and promoted safety equipment, including alarm systems such as Safe Home Security Inc.

and MedGuard Alert, Inc. According to court filings, the defendants used robocalls to call numbers that had not signed up or agreed to calls and marketed their products. Life Management Services, Inc. kicked it up a notch when it came to robocall scam. While young people can just as easily fall for this next scam, its subject matter left seniors most at risk. Triangle Media Corp dealt in the world of anti-aging scams.

To protect consumers long term, those listed as Defendants on the case were barred from similar or future illegal conduct. This is also true when the language appears to have been created by a foreign scammer and not from a legitimate organization. Holly Zink from Safeguarde gives us a few signs to look out for scams:. When a deal or opportunity seems too good to be true, it usually is.

Be wary of anyone saying they have a once in a lifetime deal for you, especially if they ask for your personal information to get it. The number one scam red flag is when someone says you need to send them money before getting something.

Lottery scammers often use this technique on the elderly. In scam and phishing emails , scammers will often copy an actual company website to make their offer seem legitimate. However, some elderly scams via phone, email, or web can be sophisticated and look like duplicates of real government bodies, businesses, or professional sites. Due to that confusion, use the following additional tips to determine cons from actual companies! Assume that any unusual calls you receive might not be what they sound like.

Even if the caller says they are from an official organization, ask for a call back number and verify it is correct online. Do not trust a phone number just because it appears in caller ID, as scammers can use caller ID spoofing to cause fake numbers to look like they are from a genuine organization. You will never be asked to pay a fee for a legitimate prize.

If you receive a call about an award of winnings, ask for follow-up in writing and check the fine-print and websites associated with the prize. Links in emails or on websites are called hyperlinks, and they can say a word or location different than the actual web address or URL. Watch out for web pages that impersonate legitimate sites — government sites end in. You should also share your experience and report any fraud or suspected fraud to the FTC :. Luka Arežina Co-Founder of Data Prot has this to say:.

Statistics show that by March , more than 14 billion data records have either been lost or stolen online, which is even more reason to be extremely cautious online. One of the most common ways for hackers to access your data online is through public WiFi networks. A lot of free networks have deficient safety, which makes them ideal for different types of breaches.

This means avoid online purchases or any type of activities that will expose your credit card number, passport, and ID information, or sensitive passwords.

You should also heed these tips:. This can also impact your credit and risk identity theft. When you receive a suspected or suspicious phone call, immediately hang up the phone or do not reply. Report internet scams, phone scams, or suspected scams, mainly when they result in financial loss. Scammers also know that seniors are more vulnerable during this time of loneliness, which means seniors have a huge gap that they are willing to sacrifice in order to get some spice back in their life.

A study that was performed by the FBI recently, concluded that people who were born in the era of pres are much more trusting than our current generations. This means that seniors are much more likely to trust someone like a scammer, thus giving the scammer a much higher chance of a successful scam versus targeting the younger generation. While some seniors report scams , the vast majority do not.

This is because most seniors do not know where to report these people, or even where to get started. This gives a scammer a perfect reason to target seniors for the sole reason of having a much less chance of being caught, much less reported. This reason is partially because seniors may not want their family to think they are losing cognitive function, in relation to not knowing what to do. Always contact your local authorities if you suspect you are being scammed; they will guide you in the right direction.

They know that often, seniors have extra money reserves built up over time, and when mixed with the fact that they may feel lonely and more trusting in their later years, this ends up in a train wreck causing the senior to fall victim. In some cases, this has gone on for years due to the fact that some seniors have diseases such as dementia, causing the senior to confuse the scammer as someone like a grandson.

Though the current generation undoubtedly cares, it is no surprise that the senior citizens do as well, if not much more. Scammers realize this and take full advantage. A scammer may ask for money after a short time of convincing the elder he loves her, and make some sort of excuse like they need immediate life-saving surgery. The senior, caring as much as she does, sends the money with no hesitation.

Although the desire to look nice in a profile is natural, sometimes when something looks too good to be true, it probably is. A few ways to spot a fake or bogus profile photo is by checking out the background, clothing, jewelry, vehicles, or any other materialistic items.

For example, if you are browsing through the options available to you and come across a profile with a man sitting in front of a Lamborghini, or wearing a Rolex watch, this is cause for suspicion. Obviously, this does not automatically write this person off as a scammer, but it is important to understand that scammers particularly love using these photos.

Nothing grabs the attention of others more than luxury cars and expensive material items that a simple swipe could acquire you. Scammers typically like using stock photos as well — which leads to our next prevention method, Google reverse image search. Google reverse image search is a great way to distinguish whether or not an image is stolen. The process is really quite easy. You can simply head over to Google and upload any photo you would like, and Google will search billions of websites to see which ones that photo has been uploaded to.

But how do you know if the photo is stolen? One way to check if that photo has been stolen is to check if it has been uploaded by profiles using different names. You may even find that it is actually a stock photo. If this is the case, then it is very likely a stolen photo used to catfish. However, if you find that the photo is connected to only one name, then they are most likely who they say they are. The main purpose of dating websites is to find the right match, so you can set a date to see if the two of you connect.

Scammers obviously will avoid this, but they can be very creative about the way they avoid it. This can be anything from a minimal cold to something more drastic, like a sudden accident, hence their unavailability. If you ever find yourself matched with someone and they prefer to wait a week or two before meeting in person, there is typically nothing to worry about.

But if this goes on for more than a few weeks, this could be cause for suspicion. While scammers may try to scam you by stealing personal information, the most common way they get you is by requesting money.

They can sometimes get very creative about what they tell you the money is for. Criminals use money mules to move money either electronically or physically. The money mule scammer asks to use your bank accounts to receive then transfer it to a third party.

It may seem harmless since the criminal is not asking for money from you; however, this is the farthest thing from the truth. If you have the misfortune to be involved in a money mule scam , then at best, you will only have your accounts frozen during the investigation but, money mules can be prosecuted and held personally responsible for reimbursing the stolen money.

In addition to the legal ramifications, the criminals may also use your personal information for nefarious reasons, such as stealing your money or identity. Because of the possibility of not only losing your money but also being tied into the legal consequences, the money mule scam is one of the worst of the three. The scammer will send you a link for a game, app, or service. The link may lead you to a website that downloads malware into your computer without your knowledge.

The malware then gathers personal information and sends it back to the criminal. Malware can act as a spy and stay hidden in your computer to transfer essential personal data, or it can wreak havoc on your computer, causing it to crash.

Or the link may bring you to the site asking for a credit card number to proceed, instead of using malware, they just ask you for the information. The website might be for a game or chat service; ultimately, it will be an online product or service the scammer convinces you to try. Often the actual price to use or buy whatever the link is for is minimal since they just want your credit card information.

Though there are many scams, some of them have red flags that will help you to identify them. Here are a few things to watch for when using online dating sites:.

Many of us believe ourselves to be good judges of character and too smart to have the wool pulled over our eyes. However, these criminals know exactly how to sweet talk seniors out of their money. So, if you think the person you are chatting with is a scam artist, first end all communication with them.

Next, if you gave the person money, contact your bank or credit card company and cancel the payment. Finally, report any suspected activity to the FTC. Looking for a media contact. I have a survey about senior romance scams to share for consideration. Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Skip to primary navigation Skip to main content Dating Websites Meal Delivery Medication Dispensers Mobility Scooters Retirement Spots Estate Planning.

Cruises Exercise Equipment Hearing Aids Home Security Laptops Portable Oxygen Walk-In Tubs Scams Video Games. This website is a participant in the Amazon Associates affiliate program. All links to Amazon should be considered affiliate links and the owner will receive a commission for each item purchased.

Your Report comes with access to People Search tools to look up contact and background information for all owners. Your Report includes access to Unlimited:.

Property Information, Ownership History, Assessed and Market Value, Tax Payment History, and more Inofrmation available. Password reset instructions sent to your email. Although the FTC reports that seniors and the elderly are proving doubters wrong and reporting online criminals and consumer fraud at ever-increasing rates, there is still a catch: elderly scams are rising as each year passes by.

The only thing you should have to worry about in retirement is the next trip you want to take! Next time you grow tired of people doubting your decision-making abilities, due to your age, let them know the facts. People who are Baby Boomers on up are the least likely of ANY AGE GROUP to lose money to scams. Similarly to , when consumers ages 60 and older spotted or encountered scams in , they avoided losing money at twice the rate of those ages Everyone from the AARP to the FBI and FTC is spreading the word about senior financial scams.

It is a detailed October 18, report by the Federal Trade Commission that was given to Congress. However, these statistics on their own do not solve the broader scope of the problem. Even as those reports make the case that older adults are less likely to fall for consumer fraud, has ushered in some very alarming statistics.

Per both age groups, financial loss in categories such as romance scams and imposter business scams were equivalent or close. Ring, ring! For people who are ages 60 and over, who received contact by phone, online, email, consumer-initiated contact, and mail, the list popular contract method are phone calls k.

Out of those k fraud reports, 15k resulted in financial loss. The FTC knows that even with all their efforts to prevent and educate about scams, there are still fraudsters who will fall through the cracks and locate elderly victims.

Cash is still a favorite of scammers, as it can be hard to trace. How does the FTC compile their data? It is through the Consumer Sentinel Report, which is , collected almost 3. As our world becomes more tech-based, older adults are online and using apps and technology more and more. Scams also happen when they pick up the phone.

These are the seven most common scams that seniors fall for and what they are. They pose as health, medical insurance, or Medicare representatives. This type of scam increases around the Open Enrollment period in the fall. This could result in your benefits being denied when you do need service or medical supplies!

In a medical emergency, this could be a disaster! Arthur Bretschneider, CEO and Co-founder of Seniorly gives us insight on Medicare and health insurance fraud:. So that makes it easier for them to set up Medicare scams. Posing as Medicare representatives, these perpetrators get seniors to give them information on the phone, online, or sometimes at the front door. You receive a call or robocall about your computer, email account , wireless internet, or computer virus scan.

There are several ways they do this. Other tech support scams use common computer problems as a reason to trick you into paying — over the phone or online — for unneeded, unnecessary tech support services.

They will push for you to pay them by gift card, prepaid card, cash reload card, or to transfer money through an app. Their goal? They want you to pay by methods that will quickly generate for them and be difficult for you to reverse or undo! Allan Buxton, Director of Forensics at Secure Forensics offers his insights on tech support scams:. More importantly, most scammers play the short game, pushing for an immediate resolution to whatever the problem is buy our antivirus, pay your tax penalties over the phone, buy off the hitman , etc.

Slow things down. Ask for the issue in writing. Many consumers find their voicemail box full of these sorts of telemarketing spammer calls. The FTC knows that skeptical consumers are more likely to stay safe. The truth is that most phone calls of this variety are scams. This is how it works. They will offer you reduced rates so you can finally!

pay off your credit cards. Limited time offers are their big draw, and, because of this, the FTC has implored the public to recognize that consumers have the same ability and resources available to them, without getting help from a paid company. Even in retirement, many seniors are interested in earning extra money.

Unfortunately, scammers create schemes that will seem easy at first glance but are disastrous upon further inspection. These schemes can include pyramid scams, home medical billing, work at home business offers, envelope stuffing schemes, mystery shopping scams, government job scams, and more.

You might be asked to pay a fee upfront to receive a list of business opportunities most of which are illegitimate or useless or redirected to a website that will phish your personal information. The FTC wants consumers to beware that scam artists likely run most work at home opportunities and pop-up business opportunities.

Classified ads also create fake job offers, beware of requests to pay for the job or deposit a check or overage and transfer the money to your employer. Not only does the FTC want seniors to be careful, but MoneyGram and Western Union do too. All money transfer and wire services, along with financial institutions, know that consumers can and will be extorted from. Seniors might wire or transfer money to someone they have a personal connection with online via romance scams or for an internet purchase such as buying a vehicle.

Other times, seniors receive a check in the mail and are asked to transfer the funds. As it is a counterfeit check, it may not be realized until you deposit it, transfer funds, and get charged bank fees and deducted the sum you transferred.

The short version of this long story is to beware of money transfers as it can be a form of fraud. You hear about a fantastic property or rental. The owner sends you pictures of the property and the address.

Since the owner is traveling for work and out of the area, they ask for you to submit your information and send them a deposit via cash through the mail, through money wire, or app transfer. Unfortunately, several things can happen. When you submit your credit report and app by email, you will expose all your information to the fraudster.

They might use it to open fake financial accounts in your name or sell your information. Either way, you have then been a victim of identity theft. Or, they keep any money you send them. The property was never theirs, to begin with, and a foreign scammer usually run elderly scams. Instead, the consumer agrees to something free and straightforward, such as a one time sample or credit report.

Once they access the report, they are suddenly signed up for ongoing paid fees. This type of scam can happen when you buy any product that signs you up for ongoing delivery monthly, until or unless you opt-out. Automatic billing is often part of negative option marketing.

Even companies that people trust take advantage of this type of billing. However, anti-aging and health claims trick seniors into useless products, overpriced products, or products that will keep renewing monthly without their consent — similar to negative option marketing. These products can even be dangerous, such as fake Botox or products that serve no actual value but are marketed and sold as healthy. Anti-aging and health claim scams typically tell lies, and false claims are used when advertising.

This type of scam strikes everyone age 40 and up. They are then told they have to complete a form within five days of receiving this letter, which asks for personal information. With personal information and fees, scammers can then perform identity theft and steal even more money from these innocent seniors.

The following are recent, relevant settlements with the FTC related to elderly scams. Each of these examples provides seniors and their families with cautionary tales about what to look for, avoid, and how to handle similar situations. The FTC settled with the defendants at Hite Media Group, LLC, over their fraudulent grant scheme. The con targeted seniors and those with disabilities who wanted help with personal expenses.

When we warned you about sweepstakes scams, we had good reason. The FTC and the State of Missouri recently settled their March case against the company, Next-Gen, which impacted and targeted older adults. Most frightening, the company sold and promoted safety equipment, including alarm systems such as Safe Home Security Inc.

and MedGuard Alert, Inc. According to court filings, the defendants used robocalls to call numbers that had not signed up or agreed to calls and marketed their products. Life Management Services, Inc. kicked it up a notch when it came to robocall scam. While young people can just as easily fall for this next scam, its subject matter left seniors most at risk.

Triangle Media Corp dealt in the world of anti-aging scams. To protect consumers long term, those listed as Defendants on the case were barred from similar or future illegal conduct. This is also true when the language appears to have been created by a foreign scammer and not from a legitimate organization. Holly Zink from Safeguarde gives us a few signs to look out for scams:. When a deal or opportunity seems too good to be true, it usually is.

Be wary of anyone saying they have a once in a lifetime deal for you, especially if they ask for your personal information to get it.

The number one scam red flag is when someone says you need to send them money before getting something.

Elderly Scams: The Definitive Guide to Protect Seniors,In this article we cover:

AdAvoid Romance Scams and Fake Online Profiles. Expert Dating Investigations. Professional Dating Background Checks, Real InvestigationsBBB A+ Rating · Confidential Services · Discreet PI’s/5 (83 reviews) AdExplore Our 5 Best Senior Dating Sites & You Could Find Love. Create A Profile Today! See Why Singles Love These Dating Sites. Find Something Serious Or Casual. Start Today!  · Seniors might wire or transfer money to someone they have a personal connection with online (via romance scams) or for an internet purchase (such as buying a vehicle). ... read more

Start Here. Seniors especially are at risk of scams aimed at getting ahold of their savings. How does the FTC compile their data? As internet dating has grown in popularity, so has the amount of money scammed from seniors. Tinder Search: 4 Little Known Ways to Search a Profile September 14th, by Kennedy Badger.

Slow things down. Comments Looking for a media contact, elderly online dating scams. Obviously, this does not automatically write this person off as a scammer, but it is important to understand that scammers particularly love using these photos. All Categories. Scammers also know that seniors are more vulnerable during this time of loneliness, which elderly online dating scams seniors have a huge gap that they are willing to sacrifice in order to get some spice back in their life. Cruises Exercise Equipment Hearing Aids Home Security Laptops Portable Oxygen Walk-In Tubs Scams Video Games. Many of us believe ourselves to be good judges of character and too smart to have the wool pulled over our eyes.

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