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Freakonomics Radio,Episode Transcript

 · Mandi, however, is a big fan of Freakonomics Radio. GRZELAK: I listened to the podcast on a Thursday morning on my way to work and it was titled “ What You Don’t Know What You Don’t Know About Online Dating. Season 6, Episode 23 On this week’s episode of Freakonomics Radio: an economist’s guide to dating online. PJ Vogt bravely lets us  · Mar 22, A Freakonomics reader (we’ll call her “Sugar Baby”) is documenting her two-week experiment with online “Sugar Daddy Dating”: “beautiful women post pictures Npr freakonomics online dating - If you are a middle-aged man looking to have a good time dating woman half your age, this article is for you. Rich woman looking for older man &  · Transcript. Steven Levitt's best-selling book, Freakonomics, revitalized economics by explaining how economic principles affect our daily lives. With the economy so prominent in Missing: online dating ... read more

She got probably 10 times the number of messages that my real profile got. I asked my friend Rae Johnston, who is an Australian-based model and actress, if I could raid her Facebook photos. She very kindly said yes. So Aaron Carter fan is stunningly good-looking. REED: Well, after so many messages started rolling, the optimist in me decided that these men had just seen the pretty photo and had not read her profile.

My goal at that point became to convince them that she is just awful, that she is the worst woman on earth. I would threaten to pull out their teeth. What are you doing on Friday? REED: I actually, believe it or not, did not want to meet any of these men in real life.

Alli Reed wrote a fake OkCupid profile for a really good-looking year-old woman who also happened to be a racist, gold-digging, fake-pregnant-getting nightmare — and she got almost 1, replies. Paul OYER: When men are deciding who to contact on dating sites, looks matter a great deal. An Illustration of the Pitfalls of Multiple Hypothesis Testing.

Now, why did Oyer suddenly turn his attention to online dating? And, more important, he realized, dating could be much improved if only everybody approached it like an economist would. Now, of course he would say that — he is an economist.

But whoever you are, when it comes to online dating, it helps to start with some facts:. However, you will indirectly. A typical study will find that a person with one more year of education holding everything else equal makes 8 to 10 percent more than someone with one fewer year of education. An overweight person who is otherwise medium attractive will do almost as well as a medium attractive person who is not overweight. OYER: Men, on the other hand, care a lot less about income.

They find that once you get out of this world into real relationships, relationships tend to be less stable and happy if the woman makes more money than the man. So that makes sense that women should be more attracted to money than men to begin with. Okay, so Paul Oyer knows a good bit about the rules of attraction in online dating — which, if you think about it, is just dating with a much bigger pool and a much better filter.

In other words — is he any good at giving actual online dating advice? For instance: how do you build the best profile ever? Is it better to choose a big site like Match. com or a niche site like GlutenFreeSingles. com which is real? Should you lie — and if so, about what? And P. is a brave, brave soul — because he let us open up his OkCupid profile and pick it apart, on the radio:.

Vogt and Oyer sat down with Suzie Lechtenberg , a producer on our show. VOGT: Oh boy. VOGT: Okay, so it says what are you doing with your life? VOGT: Okay. I was pretending to know but I had no idea. VOGT: Yeah. VOGT: Oh, this is the worst part. What are we looking for here? Someone to hang out with? OYER: Okay, before we even look at it, the first thing an economist is going to do is think about supply and demand.

New York City is demographically more female than male. We have an oversupply of men relative to women, at least compared to other cities. New York City and Washington D. tend to swing much more towards more available women. Now the other thing to keep in mind here is time is very much on your side. You should be picky.

You should be looking for a really good match. The reason for that is suppose you do find just the right person, get married, and live happily ever after. I should be searching a little less carefully. I should be settling. Settling is a very important idea to economists because of what we call search theory , [which] suggests that at some point you should realize that having what you have is better than expending more resources to try to do better.

So Paul Oyer is telling P. Vogt that P. is in pretty good shape, dating wise. VOGT: My friends and I talk about this all the time. My female friends and my male friends all feel that this is true. Men in New York and in cities where my friends live, everyone can actually feel these market forces and we talk about them.

And I hate them. That sounds terrible applied to dating. VOGT: Just the idea of that the search sucks, even if the search is like weighted in your favor. OYER: Okay, so a couple of things can help you out here: one is if the technology is good enough on the dating site, you want a huge dating site that gives you just a very, very small fraction of the available people on the site. But just think about a boardwalk. At one end of the boardwalk is people who are completely incompatible for you, with you for one reason.

At the other end of the boardwalk is people who are completely incompatible for you for another reason. OYER: Then think of all the women who might be in your, potentially, in your market as being evenly distributed along this boardwalk, where the ones that happen to be right next to you are perfect fits for you, or very good fits for you. And the ones at the extremes are not. Well, obviously the more women on that boardwalk the better you are.

This is what we call a thick market effect. It does have the opposite problem that thicker markets lead to more costs of screening all the potential candidates. Now, does that make you nervous? If so, we can help. Coming up on Freakonomics Radio : how to build the best online dating profile ever:.

OYER: As an economist, I look at that and I want to suggest the following: that you fill in more detail keeping in mind two ideas that are very important in economics. Justin WOLFERS: The Internet has turned matching upside down. Now you see all the attributes and then you learn about compatibility later.

You fill in your ethnicity, body type, diet, religion, income, astrological sign, the pets you love, or hate. The economist Paul Oyer, the author of Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned From Online Dating , told P. OYER: As I discuss in the book, people lie all the time online.

OYER: Okay, so you might not want to reveal that. VOGT: I mean, kind of, honestly. OYER: That may be true. OYER: In some of the questions it asks you how into deep conversations with your mate, and cuddling, and things like that you are. I may have made myself seem a bit more accessible in those dimensions than an honest person would say. So Paul Oyer admits he fibbed a little bit. And if they send the wrong message, it might be better to tone them down a little bit.

So… what kind of signals was P. Vogt sending out? I said I drink socially, which is stretching it a little bit. I probably drink more than socially.

It says that I speak English okay. OYER: There you go, exactly. As an economist I look at that and I want to suggest the following: that you fill in more detail keeping in mind two ideas that are very important in economics. They are statistical discrimination and adverse selection. OYER: No, no. One of them is they like rich men. I think I have a firm idea of the person who is probably going to like me. Can I throw a little economics jargon at you guys?

OYER: What you want to remember in your profile is that you want to be very upfront and forthcoming in anything that is what an economist would call a coordination game. In my case, I was very upfront and forthcoming in my profile about the fact that I had a large and badly behaved golden retriever, and the fact that I have two teenaged children. Because if somebody was against those things, then those were deal breakers.

But the beauty of that is you still have plenty of time to learn that. You have time to experiment, make some mistakes, and then you have A time for the reasons we talk about and B you have this very thick market of available women where you live.

Well, it did. He found his significant other on JDate. Vogt, too. A few weeks after they talked, I asked P. how he changed his OkCupid profile:. VOGT: Generally, the sense that I got from talking to him was that I came off as a flippant alcoholic. So I was trying to diminish that. So I cut, I think, one reference to drinking.

What I did … he said I should fill out more of the basic questions about me. VOGT: Yes. He told me to put in a picture of myself more presentable so I took a picture of myself from a wedding …. DUBNER: Oh yeah. VOGT: Also, I put a picture with my dog, which felt like to the spirit of his advice, and a bunch of old ladies. DUBNER: Oh my god. You are canny!

This is actually a perfect mirror, in a way, of the other picture of you at the wedding with four young good looking girls. Now here you are on a park bench — in what looks like Brooklyn — holding a dog. also tweaked his profile a bit, as Paul Oyer suggested. You can also read the transcript , which includes credits for the music you'll hear in the episode. The episode is, for the most part, an economist's guide to dating online.

Even virtual roses used in Korean online dating experiments. In a new working paper by main author Soohyung Lee of the University of Maryland, economists studied the impact on preference signaling - signals sent to a select few. In the study, a major online dating company in Korea organized dating events with participants, half men and half women. This episode is included in the Freakonomics smartbinge podcast playlist at wnyc.

Freakonomics Radio www. html I just read Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. The only reason I bring this up is there were a few pages about online dating. Freakonomics online dating podcast Freakonomics online dating podcast amateur webcams porn media ceo nancy dubuc on dating ne veux pas de vous et to freakonomics talked about online dating ep. With the profile down very quickly. It's only natural to find a part of that explore the 0.

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 · How do they get what they want? Economist Steven Levitt sets out to explore such questions, along with some of life's riddles, in Freakonomics, co-authored by Stephen J. Dubner. A professor at the Missing: online dating  · Mandi, however, is a big fan of Freakonomics Radio. GRZELAK: I listened to the podcast on a Thursday morning on my way to work and it was titled “ What You Don’t Know  · Fresh air npr online dating questions for a producer after 50 million britons visit a rogue economist explores the freakonomics, fox news and other. When Stanford professor We think of them as intellectual enclaves and the surest route to a better life. But U.S. colleges also operate like firms, trying to differentiate their products to win market share and prestige Missing: npr · online dating  · Mar 22, A Freakonomics reader (we’ll call her “Sugar Baby”) is documenting her two-week experiment with online “Sugar Daddy Dating”: “beautiful women post pictures  · Transcript. Steven Levitt's best-selling book, Freakonomics, revitalized economics by explaining how economic principles affect our daily lives. With the economy so prominent in Missing: online dating ... read more

REED: Well, after so many messages started rolling, the optimist in me decided that these men had just seen the pretty photo and had not read her profile. Should you lie — and if so, about what? While I have not examined their data and what a treasure trove that must be to an economist! Mandi GRZELAK: Hello! So… what kind of signals was PJ Vogt sending out?

Levitt and Stephen J. In a new working paper by main author Soohyung Lee of the University of Marylandeconomists studied the impact on preference signaling — signals sent to a npr freakonomics online dating few. The economist Paul Oyer, npr freakonomics online dating, the author of Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned From Online Datingtold P. We look at how these traits affect our daily lives and why we couldn't change them even if we wanted to. Should you lie — and if so, about what? DUBNER: Really?

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